Yulin

cow loveI had never heard of this place, Yulin, until a couple of months ago. I believe, translated it means Jade Forest. It is a city in the north west province of China once associated with coal mining and now with fracking for natural shale gas. What it seems to be most famous for however is a summer solstice tradition for eating dog (and cat) meat that has kicked off a flurry of aggrieved and shocked petitions all over the internet. Tradition seems to be a rather generous term since, in all the articles I have read, it appears to have begun in about 2009/10.

Issues arising from the widespread publicity about the festival are largely around animal cruetly and slaughter, animal theft and smuggling, and public health issues for although you cannot contract rabies from eating dog, you can from handling infected animals, and approximately 10,000 dogs are traded to support the festivities. China has the second highest incidence of rabies in humans in the world, according to the WHO.

I have signed all the petitions. I live with a dog. I am part of a culture that on the whole is dog-loving (I leave aside the horrors of illegal dog fighting, and fox hunting – how far removed is a fox from a dog as a species anyway?) but I am curious about the horrified feelings of my co-petitioners, because while the suffering and slaughter of 10,000 companion animals is a staggering amount it is a small number when the number of farmed animals slaugherterd in the UK alone is considered. These are the latest figures I could lay my hands on, they don’t account for the thousands of deaths on farms due to disease, accidents, transportation or neglect.

“In 2013, more than 989.6 million farmed animals were slaughtered for meat in the UK, according to official figures. Of these, 2.6 million were cattle, 10.3 million pigs, 14.5 million sheep, 17.5 million turkeys and nearly 945 million chickens.”

That is a lot of animals.

This has all left me a bit bewildered about the consensus view of farmed animals and companion animals, for there is something intriguing about the way our minds have been conditioned to find it OK to treat one member of species with love and affection and another member of a species as OK to eat for dinner.  And going back to foxes and internet petitions, intrigued I am again about how the UK government would react if there was a worldwide push from Chinese animal acitvistst against the proposed repeal of the Hunting Act. Now that’s something to think about over my sweet potato pancakes this morning.

Guardian article November 2014, concerning unreported farm animal deaths

Guardian article March 2015, concerning Tory government backing for repeal of Hunting Act

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